THE ISLAY STAR

SINGLE CASK

“On Islay, whisky is life and life is whisky. Furthermore, to quote Leo Tolstoy, ‘life is love’. You’ll rarely meet an Ileach who isn’t greeting you with ready cheer whilst pressing a dram into your hand. The island is known for its peat smoke - peat reek to some - and they take their whisky seriously too. Once the seat of the Lord of the Isles, men to rival any King of Scots, Islay is a Gaelic culture, a story-telling, welcoming place with people at its heart. No wonder the whisky is as memorable as the place!”

Aedan Andrejus Burt

THE ISLAND STAR

SINGLE CASK

“Scotland’s islands are rugged and remote, yet places of incomparable beauty - much like the whisky. From Arran - almost a tropical resort - in the Firth of Clyde, to Mull and Skye off the West Coast, to the Orkneys in the North, they are lands of great variety. Many of Scotland’s cleverest folk musicians have come from the isles. Although hard to get to, they are well worth the trip, not just for beauty spots or history, but also for amazing food, sea-fresh or straight from the field, the wonderful community, and of course, the whisky.”

Aedan Andrejus Burt

THE SPEYSIDE STAR

SINGLE CASK

“Speyside is often considered Scotland’s sweetest and most approachable region. Wherever you go, they’ll introduce you to a dram, and probably something the locals call a ‘breakfast whisky’ soon enough. Home to around 50 distilleries, over a third of Scotland’s total, the area covers a 50-mile strip between Inverness and Aberdeen, around the River Spey. For that, most distilleries have their own water source, of which they are immensely proud. The honeyed and fruity character of Speyside whiskies make them highly sought after, and the banks of the Spey accommodate many of the country’s best-known stills.”

Aedan Andrejus Burt

THE HIGHLAND STAR

SINGLE CASK

“The first thing you need to know about the Highlands: they are vast. The Highland Line came about on whisky maps for tax reasons in 1784, when customs duties were set lower in the Highlands to encourage local farmers to register their stills. It didn’t work. But it has given us a range of incredible whiskies to drink. The Highland style is often heavier and slightly spicier than Speyside, but still sweet. Peat may feature, as some distilleries maintain older practices, but there is no one representative whisky for the Highlands. Like Scotland itself, embrace the diversity.”

Aedan Andrejus Burt